Frank Gehry Architecture in Las Vegas – Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health


While in Las Vegas I had the opportunity to take some night time photography of some Frank Gehry Architecture. One of my favorite architects, this building was designed by him and became the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health.

Though his architecture is different it is a work of art and I have this love for unique architecture. In order to get there, I ordered a taxi to take me and the taxi driver was totally clueless on why I wanted to photograph this building. I’m just a big fan and Love Frank Gehry architecture.

Architect Frank Gehry says he wanted a swirling stainless steel structure he designed for Las Vegas to be unique – to stand out from what he called “the cacophony” of high-rise casinos and condos forming the spine of Sin City’s sprawl.

Getting his first look at the nearly complete Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, he declared himself satisfied.

“It took my breath away,” he said. “I like the way it fits. I wasn’t trying to compete with the chaos around it.”

“I mean, some people may think it’s over the top,” he added. “I don’t think so.” And as far as Im concerned it’s LOVE at first sight. Frank Gehry – you are a a big fan of mine. I love your work. It is very different and that’s what makes it unique.

Photography by: Lidia Carr Photography (copyrights)ImageImageImageImageImageFrank Gehry Architecture, Lidia Carr PhotographyImagephy, Las Vegas, Cleveland CliniImagec Lou Ruvo Center.ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

While in Las Vegas I had the opportunity to take some night time photography of some Frank Gehry Architecture.  One of my favorite architects, this building was designed by him and became the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health.

Though his architecture is different it is a work of art and I have this love for unique architecture.   In order to get there, I ordered a taxi to take me and the taxi driver was totally clueless on why I wanted to photograph this building.   I’m just a big fan and Love Frank Gehry architecture.

Architect Frank Gehry says he wanted a swirling stainless steel structure he designed for Las Vegas to be unique – to stand out from what he called “the cacophony” of high-rise casinos and condos forming the spine of Sin City’s sprawl.

Getting his first look at the nearly complete Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, he declared himself satisfied.

“It took my breath away,” he said. “I like the way it fits. I wasn’t trying to compete with the chaos around it.”

“I mean, some people may think it’s over the top,” he added. “I don’t think so.”   And as far as Im concerned it’s LOVE at first sight.  Frank Gehry – you are a a big fan of mine.  I love your work.  It is very different and that’s what makes it unique.

Photography by:  Lidia Carr Photography (copyrights)ImageImageImageImageImageFrank Gehry Architecture, Lidia Carr PhotographyImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

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Photography Love

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Photography is my addiction and no intervention required.  I love capturing those special moments and creating the memories.  Photography is something that you cannot explain if you have this extreme love for it.  When I’m behind the lens, I am … Continue reading

Tomb of the Unknown and the Changing of the Guards – Washington, DC


Guarding the Tomb

During the day  the guard is changed every hour. The ceremony can be witnessed by the public at the Arlington Cemetery in Washington, DC

The guard change is very symbolic, but also conducted in accordance with Army regulations. The relief commander or assistant relief commander, along with the oncoming guard, are both required for a guard change to take place. The guard being relieved will say to the oncoming guard, “Post and orders remain as directed.” The oncoming guard’s response is always, “Orders acknowledged.”

Tomb Guards

It is considered one of the highest honors to serve as a Sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknowns. Fewer than 20 percent of all volunteers are accepted for training and of those only a fraction pass training to become full-fledged Tomb Guards. This attrition rate has made the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge the second least-awarded decoration of the United States Military (the first being the Army Astronaut Badge, no longer being issued).

The soldier “walking the mat” does not wear rank insignia on his or her uniform so that they do not outrank the Unknowns, whatever their rank may have been. Non-commissioned officers (usually the Relief Commander and Assistant Relief Commanders), do wear insignia of their rank when changing the guard only. They have a separate uniform (without rank) that is worn when they actually guard the Unknowns or are “Posted”.

Walking the Mat

There is a meticulous routine which the guard follows when watching over the graves:

  1. The soldier walks 21 steps across the Tomb. This alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given to any military or foreign dignitary in America. His weapon is always on the shoulder opposite the Tomb (i.e., on the side of the gallery watching the ritual).
  2. On the 21st step, the soldier turns and faces the Tomb for 21 seconds.
  3. The soldier then turns to face the other way across the Tomb and changes his weapon to the outside shoulder.
  4. After 21 seconds, the first step is repeated.

This is repeated until the soldier is relieved of duty at the Changing of the Guards.

Other requirements of the Guard:

They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES. They cannot swear in public FOR THE REST OF THEIR LIVES and cannot disgrace the uniform {fighting} or the tomb in any way.

After TWO YEARS, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin.

The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror.

DEDICATED to being an American and honoring those who have fought and LOST.

These series of photos was taken with my Canon Mark II and the 24-105 mm lens.  A day of remembrance as I stood in silence knowing that I worry about things that are very small. When you see the Changing of The Guards, your perspective on life is delivered to you in a format that will make you understand what being an American is.

A Great Day with a 35mm 1.4 Prime Lens


Several weeks ago, I became the owner of a prime lens – Canon 1.4 35mm and got to test this little lens on some cute little models.  All I can say is WOW!  Love it and it will definitely become one of my favorites.   Just recently I also became the proud owner of a new addition  – A Canon Mark III and I can’t even describe this phenomenon.   So much to learn, so little time.   Photography doesn’t have a destination.  It keeps going for those who are serious about getting into it. Learning this business is endless.  For now, enjoy and continue doing what you LOVE.   For me the answer is obvious.